News

Gender, age and disability: updated resources for trainers

  • Home
  • News
  • Gender, age and disability: updated resources for trainers

RedR Trainer Kate Denman talks about how the Age and Disability Capacity Building Programme (ADCAP) helps to bring inclusion into humanitarian work

 Kate co-delivered a RedR Training of Trainers course in Nepal  earlier this year, where she trained people to use the ADCAP Minimum Standards for Age and Disability Inclusion and Sphere Standards, and how to train others on to use the two standards hand-in-hand. 

The most vulnerable groups must be included into all action. If not, we are failing to meet the humanitarian principles that guide our work... These are groups that must be targeted first, but the sector has notoriously been blind to these elements.

Kate Denman

RedR Trainer

A complete package for humanitarian trainers

Kate explains: 'RedR is part of a consortium of agencies involved in the ADCAP project. At the time I was Project Manager for RedR, and I managed the production of part of the resources for which RedR was responsible. The updated materials - which are a collaboration between all seven agencies within ADCAP and which include a trainer handbook, a workbook for trainees, and a PowerPoint presentation - is a complete package for a humanitarian trainer to deliver an introductory level course.

'The 2-day programme is free to download for any humanitarians who want to deliver the training. The package has been designed to be flexible in its use, allowing the trainer delivering the course to easily adapt the course to the context where they work and to suit different participants.

'Looking ahead, a new edition of the ADCAP Minimum Standards for Age and Disability Inclusion (currently in pilot version) will be available early next year, which is likely to result in further updating of the resources.

Mainstreaming inclusion

'The ADCAP materials have also informed the Gender, Age and Disability training course that RedR now runs in the UK, Kenya and Sudan,' continues Kate. 'It is crucial that gender, age and disability are mainstreamed into all humanitarian work. The most vulnerable groups must be included in all action, if not, we are failing to meet the very principles which guide our work: the humanitarian principles. These vulnerabilities are part of a diverse profile of every individual, and they are also intersectional, which means that you may be a woman, with a disability and elderly, in which case in most contexts you are likely not to be accessing aid. These are groups that need to be targeted first, but the sector has notoriously been blind to these elements.

'I do believe that the sector is improving, and training, advocacy and raising awareness all help. Gender mainstreaming has come a long way in the past 10 years. Even if it still has a huge task ahead, there is progress. In 10 years I think we will see more gender, age and disability inclusion as a requirement from all donors and as a standard by all practitioners. However, changing attitudes, practices and policies takes time.'